Antonio Meucci

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Antonio Meucci, the inventor of the telephone, is believed to have invented the unlisted number in 1871 in order to end a series of nuisance calls asking him to switch long-distance carriers to Bell.

After 113 years Meucci is the inventor of the telephone[edit]

The 1888 White Page, on which Meucci is indeed unlisted.

Resolution No. 269, as passed in the US House of Representatives in 2001, acknowledges all of Meucci's claims dating from the 1870's:

  • As inventor of the telephone, Meucci is entitled to an unlisted number and to send any undesired calls to voice-mail.
  • No, he doesn't have to return your calls. Don't like it? Go invent your own telephone.
  • Your call is important to us and will be answered in sequence. Unless you're a telemarketer. Those are shot on sight.
  • Antonio does not wish to have his carpets cleaned by some fly-by-night outfit dialling randomly or from the 'phone book. Now go away.
  • Oh, and why should Antonio have to pay extra to invent call display just because yo mamma didn't teach you any manners?
  • Antonio does not wish to receive more calls from l'il Alexander asking "Is your refrigerator running? You better go catch it."
  • No, it's not ok to send junk faxes... what part of "freedom of the press for anyone that owns one" don't you understand?
  • While you're at it, would you stop clogging the Babbage Analytical Engine with canned luncheon meat? That's annoying.

The basic principles established in this resolution were then used by Congress as the basis of the CAN-SPAM Act, which acknowledges the right of congress-critters to a hot meal instead of luncheon meat from a can.

See also[edit]