Italic

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Italic is defined as an item which has come from Italy.

Italic is generally applied to the florid, lilting style of text, which fits well with the poofter nature of many of Italy's more notable citizens.

A key feature of italic culture is the slant - the ability to see the world literally at a different angle. Italic professors have worked hard on methods of slanting, and all agree that ingestion of large quantities of alcohol is the most effective way of producing a slant in the individual, or in extreme cases, the world.

Perhaps the crowning achievement of the italic slant philosophy is the leaning Tower of Pisa, leaning an impressive 84.5 degrees from the horizontal.

Remember: Italic IS NOT Bold

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People who are italic [edit]

Leonardo da Vinci
By designing inventions for which he had no need, such as the parachute, he creates a parallel world world for himself - which is an impressive 180 degree slant.
Galileo Galilei
Being a purebred italic, Galileo saw the world at a different angle to everyone else. Because of his crazy logic, he correctly deduced that the earth revolves around the sun. However, the Pope disagreed and locked him up for severe madness. Despite living in Rome, the Pope is not italic, preferring to live in his own little country, and his schlong.
Michelangelo
Was instructed to paint the walls of the Sistine Chapel, but did so with an acute slant.
Luciano Pavarotti
By the modern day, many people in Italy were finally cured of being italic, having channeled all italic energy into Gianni Versace.