Nynorsk

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Nynorsk (or New Norwegian) is the official language of New Norway. It is together with Sanskrit (India) and Latin (Vatican state) one of the three official languages in the world that is spoken by no one.

Nynorsk was created as a nationalist reaction against the Danish influence on the other Norwegian language in Norway, Bokmål (or Book Tounge). Since no one really knew how Norwegian originally sounded after 1,000 years of alterning Danish and Swedish rule, the linguists in the newly born Norwegian state travelled to the most remote and unreachable habited place in middle between Hardanger- and Sognefjord in 1908 to interview an old man who allegedly spoke a really ancient Norwegian dialect. The man died shortly after by speech exhaustion, but from the voluminous interviews the linguists were able to reconstruct the language.

Sadly enough, in 1950 it turned out by comparing phonetic analyses that the "originality" of this man's language was a speech impediment, but at that time the language had been forcibly taught parallell with Bokmål in the schools for three generations, so it was decided that undoing this attempt to undo the linguistic history would be worse than continuing to educate in it.

Nynorsk is still being taught to the Norwegian people, although the will of the students deny it. Some people still believe nynorsk is a gift from God, which you can see in many written works – Trønderloven, for instance.