Prime minister

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A prime minister is a minister which is the product of only two other ministers: itself and one. In truth, only of whole ministers. After all, every minister is a product of every fraction minister. This theory was postulated in the late 1930s at a mathematical conference in Vienna by Arthur Van De Spagg, who also formulated the Gross Domestic Product theorem. Albert Einstein is reported to have responded, "That is der stupidest idea I have ever heard in my entire life." Einstein, always considered a crackpot among scientists, was thrown out of the prestigious scientific community and spent the rest of his life developing some bomb thing in the United States. Also present at the conference was Oscar Wilde, who said on the matter, "Einstein's tie was delightful, but his slacks were to die for!". The theory was the subject of much debate in the 1990s, as it was alleged that John Major was an example of a Prime Minister who was actually a product of several smaller ministers, i.e. the cabinet, thus disproving the theory. However, it was later proved by the renowned mathematician Alistair Campbell that the ministers of which Major was a product were in fact not whole ministers; several of them were found to be one or two decimal places short of a whole minister. This proved that the theory was still valid.

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In Mathematics, a prime minister is a minister which is the product of only two other ministers: itself and one.