Revised Romanization of Korean

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Oh, yea. Obviously I know what all this says, I'm just not going to tell you. That's all.

“IT WAS ALRIGHT AS IT WAS FOO'!”

~ Mr. T on Romanization of Korea

Revised Romanization (RR) is an attempt at transliteration of the Korean language into a real alphabet. As the name suggests, the main purpose of Revised Romanization is to make Korean even more incomprehensible and unpronounceable to those who are not native Korean speakers. This goal is accomplished by spelling all Korean words to look like Latin ones, Latin being the 'Roman' language, and the only language more obtuse than Korean.

Revised Romanization was adopted as an official policy in South Korea (Sauseu Goria in RR), mainly because use the old system, McCune-Reischauer, led to too many foreigners in Korea correctly pronouncing Korean place names and words in phrasebooks. This epidemic of proper pronunciation greatly diminished the comic value of foreigners in Korea, and led to calls for the government to step in and handle the problem. This popular movement, combined with the upcoming 2002 World Cup, led the South Korean government to adopt Revised Romanization as its official transliteration scheme late in 2001.

The adoption of Revised Romanization (Ribaijeudeu Romanaijeisyeon in RR) led to much rejoicing in Korea, as the new spellings of all Korean names led to much mispronunciation amongst foreigners, greatly enhancing their comedic value.

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The main purpose of Revised Romanization is to make Korean even more incomprehensible and unpronounceable to those who are not native Korean speakers.