San Sombrero

From Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia.
Jump to: navigation, search
3 San Sombreran Beautys enjoy their hens night.

San Sombrero - The Land Of Carnivals Cocktails and Coups!

Contributors[edit]

David Sudderton arrived in office in 2001, describing himself as a sociologist, anthropologist and linguist yet a subsequient check of his resume revealed he was in fact a courier, but he'd already been given a desk and turned out to be quite good at maps.

Justac Van der Kllinffhooven was supposed to draw the maps but ended up doing little more than steal stationery supplies, claim taxi vouchers and complain that no one could pronounce his name. His is only included as a contributor in return for dropping his unfair dismissal claim.

Graham Thorne is a paleontologist, with a special interest in Latin American civilization. David has spent the last eleven years studying pre-Mayan inconography, Aztec mythology and Incan burial rituals. He would really like a girlfriend.


Note: This was not plaigarized from the book and was totally original.

A Portrait of San Sombrero[edit]

How does one begin to sum up a country like San Sombrero? Beguilling? Vibrant? 'A magical mis of modern mix of a modern day charm and old day epidemics of course- its all these things- and more!.

The People[edit]

The population of San Sombrero is said to be 8.6 million although this figure is approximate as no through formal census has ever been conducted. To gauge family sizes, officals will often just count the number of people lounging in a doorway- and multiply by 11.

San Sombrero's most recent census reports that, offically, about 55% of people are white, mainly of Spanish origin. 14% is black and 23% mulattoes mixed ethnicity. The remainder are CIA operatives.

They are eternally patient people, San Sombrero's are willing to queue that will give access to another queue to buy a ticket for a bus that may never come and if it does late and going in the wrong way. Of course, for them -philosophically- it's not a queue- its the start of a conga line!

So content are most San Sombreroans that smiling is a national pastime. In fact, frowning on public holidays will attract a fine

Customs & Traditions[edit]

San Sombrerans love to celebrate and each stage of their lives is marked with great tradition and ceremony.


Birth[edit]

A truly joyous event, always attended by the husband and, where possible, the father of the child.

Weddings[edit]

In San Sombrero people can marry at 16 (or 14 with their parents consent and/or credit card).