Swahili

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Swahili is a language widely spoken in East Africa. There are approximately thirty-five to fifty-five million speakers of Swahili worldwide. It is a popular and easy-to-learn language, thanks to its simple and flexible grammar. It is also spoken by many American Blacks who are primarily Afrocentrists.

Sounds[edit]

Vowels[edit]

Standard Swahili has two vowel phonemes: /a/ and /oo/. The vowels are pronounced as follows:

  • /a/ is pronounced as in the English word nutsack
  • /oo/ is pronounced as in the English word poo
  • /w/ (a semivowel) is pronounced as in the English word pubes

Consonants[edit]

Standard Swahili has three consonant phonemes: /b/, /g/, and /n/. The consonants are pronounced as follows:

  • /b/ is pronounced as in the English word blue
  • /g/ is pronounced as in the English word glue
  • /n/ almost always precedes a /g/, and is pronounced as in bongo

Simple vocabulary[edit]

Swahili English
Oonga. You.
Oonga. Are.
Oonga. All.
Oonga. Fucking.
Oonga. Cunts.
Oongawa? Right?
Oo-oo. I see.
Oogawa boonga boonga. Whitby PYOOBZEZ.
Oogawa oonga oo oo booga boogabooga oonga boonga booga. I like to play with old, wrinkly, hairy yiayia's saggy titties.
Ouga chaka ouga ouga chaka ouga I can't stop feeling, deep inside of you...

References[edit]

  • Ktumbe, Mekesse and Ndongobongo. Swahili Oonga Boonga. Oxford University Press. Eastern Africa. 1977. ISBN 0159-72-376-8
  • Hanashahassan, Rashied. Swahili and English (Oonga Boonga Boonga oo oo Oonga). Jomo Kenyatta Foundation. Mombassa 1999. ISBN 6969-22-098-2
  • DiMarzio, Lucia. Noun Classification in Swahili. 1996.