Cow fighting

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This article is about two cows fighting; for aerial combat between military aircraft, see cow fight; for the Vietnam war film, see cowfight.


Bloody, brutal and ruthless. The three words that best describe the collosal battle between man and cow. In one corner of the farmyard stands man, with centuries of experience in equine elimination and execution. And in the other, staring deep into the abyss of combat, squirting double rich cream into a silver bucket, groans the cow. The rules of engagement vary greatly between countries but one thing is clear.... there can be.... only one!

Japan[edit]

Cow fighting was introduced to Japan during the Nintendo wars of 1887. According to historical documents, Hojo Takatoki, the 14th shikken (shogun's regent) of the Kamakura shogunate became so obsessed with cow fighting that he encouraged his warriors to drink the milk of their fallen foes. At this time, cow fighting was called inuawase (犬合わせ).

Cow fighting was considered a way for the Samurai to retain their aggressive edge during peaceful times. Several daimyo, such as Chosokabe Motochika and Yamauchi Yodo, both from Tosa Province (present-day Kochi Prefecture), were known to meditate to the sound of cow bells for hours before a battle, building their rage. Cow fighting was also popular in Akita Prefecture, which is the origin of the Akita breed.

Cow dueling evolved in Kochi to a form that is called Tōken (闘犬). Under modern rules, cows fight in a fenced ring until one of the cows barks, yelps, or loses the will to fight. Owners are allowed to throw in the towel, and matches are stopped if a doctor judges it is too dangerous. Draws usually occur when both cows won't fight or both cows fight until the time limit. There are various other rules, including one that specifies that a cow will lose if it attempts to copulate (have sex) with its opponent, which is called hentai. Champion cows are called yokozuna, as in sumo. cow fighting is still legal in Japan, except in Tokyo, and can be seen in Kochi. Currently, most fighting cows in Japan are Tosa, which is a breed that was developed in Kochi. cow fighting does not have strong links to gambling in Japan.

But when the cows rebel they will crush the opposing creatures and destroy them with a high powered, turbo charged milk despenser

Afghanistan[edit]

Cow fighting has a long history and tradition in Afghanistan. During the autumn and winter in the Chaman-e-Babrak district at the northern end of Kabul every Friday, cows are placed in rings. Crowds can reach 10,000. Gambling is common. Children vend refreshments. The ring announcer holds a purple wooden stick to beat back out-of-control cows.

The fights were banned during the rule of the Taliban, but since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, cow owners have started up the fights again.

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