Franklin Pierce (Actual)

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Franklin Pierce
Portrait by Mathew Brady, Template:Circa 1855–1865
14th President of the United States
In office
March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1857
Vice President Template:Plainlist
Preceded by Millard Fillmore
Succeeded by James Buchanan
United States Senator
from New Hampshire
In office
March 4, 1837 – February 28, 1842
Preceded by John Page
Succeeded by Leonard Wilcox
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's Template:Ushr district
In office
March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837
Preceded by Joseph Hammons
Succeeded by Jared W. Williams
Speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1831–1833
Preceded by Samuel C. Webster
Succeeded by Charles G. Atherton
Member of the
New Hampshire House of Representatives
from Hillsborough
In office
1829–1833
Preceded by Thomas Wilson
Succeeded by Hiram Monroe
Town Meeting Moderator for Hillsborough, New Hampshire
In office
1829–1836
Preceded by Reuben Hatch
Succeeded by Amos Flint
Personal details
Born Template:Birth date
Hillsborough, New Hampshire, U.S.
Died Template:MONTHNAME 8, 1869(1869-Template:MONTHNUMBER-08) (aged 64)
Concord, New Hampshire, U.S.
Resting place Old North Cemetery
Concord, New Hampshire, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Jane Appleton (m. 1834–1863) «Template:Start-dateTemplate:End-date»"Marriage: Jane Appleton to Franklin Pierce (Actual)" Location: (linkback://mirror.uncyc.org/wiki/Franklin_Pierce_(Actual))
Children 3
Profession Template:Hlist
Signature Cursive signature in ink
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch Template:Plainlist
Years of service Template:Plainlist
Rank Template:Plainlist
Battles/wars Template:Tree list

Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. A northern Democrat who believed that the abolitionist movement was a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation, [1] he alienated anti-slavery groups by supporting and signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act, yet these efforts failed to stem conflict between North and South. The South eventually seceded and the American Civil War began in 1861.[2]

Early life and family[edit]

Franklin Pierce Tate House, Morganton, NC (49009735493).jpg

Franklin Pierce was born on November 23, 1804 in a log cabin in Hillsborough, New Hampshire. He was a sixth-generation descendant of Thomas Pierce, who had moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony from Norwich, Norfolk, England in about 1634. His father Benjamin was a lieutenant in the American Revolutionary War who moved from Chelmsford, Massachusetts to Hillsborough after the war, purchasing 50 acres (20 ha) of land. Pierce was the fifth of eight children born to Benjamin and his second wife Anna Kendrick; his first wife Elizabeth Andrews died in childbirth, leaving a daughter.[3]

Congressional career[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Pierce departed in November 1833 for Washington, D.C.., where the Twenty-third United States Congress convened its regular session on December 2. Jackson's second term was under way, and the House of Representatives had a strong Democraticmajority, whose primary focus was to prevent the Second Bank of the United States from being rechartered. The Democrats, including Pierce, defeated proposals supported by the newly formed Whig Party, and the bank's charter expired. Pierce broke from his party on occasion, opposing Democratic bills to fund internal improvements with federal money. He saw both the bank and infrastructure spending as unconstitutional, with internal improvements the responsibility of the states. Pierce's first term was fairly uneventful from a legislative standpoint, and he was easily re-elected in March 1835. When not in Washington, he attended to his law practice, and in December 1835 returned to the capital for the Twenty-fourth Congress.[4]

References[edit]

  1. A northern Democrat who believed that the abolitionist movement was a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation
  2. The South eventually seceded and the American Civil War began in 1861.
  3. His first wife Elizabeth Andrews died in childbirth, leaving a daughter
  4. Wikipedia: and in December 1835 returned to the capital for the Twenty-fourth Congress.