Slur

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There are two major uses of the word Slur:

Slur (The Language)[edit]

Slur is spoken in just about every country on earth. It is the most common language in the world, with English and Manganese in a distant second and third places. Because it is both common and easy to speak, Slur is often heard in places where communication in other languages can be difficult.

One common place to hear Slur being spoken is in Bars and Taverns. As one consumes alcohol, it becomes harder and harder to lift one's primary language over the environmental noise. Due to its simplicity and free-flowing tenses and sentence structures, drinkers often change to Slur as their binging evening progresses. This allows them to continue communicating with their friends, enemies, and bartender throughout the evening. Because of this, most bartenders are fluent in Slur.

There is a distinct and gradual transition of language as one concumes more alcohol, and thus speaks more in slur. It has been found that one's blood-alcohol level is directly proportional to their fluency in speaking slur. Various titan of the drinking game have pioneered the extended use of the vibrant language through excessive drinking that lead to insightful philosophical discussion.

Slur (Type of Greeting)[edit]

A Slur is also a type of formal greeting. Generally, Slurs are used between people of different races/cultures, as a universal and understandable greeting. For instance, "Hey nigger!" is a Slur often heard when white and black Americans meet. To both races such a Slur is a much more understandable phrase than the more formal, "Jolly ho there! I say, tis brilliant to see thee. Wouldst thou care for a crumpet and a spot 'o tea?" But piglatin is more popular and preferred by americans

The greeting form of Slur is often more common than the formal linguistic use of Slur, as the greeting serves to inform both parties what languages they have in common. If another, more high-order language than Slur is shared between parties, it is usually chosen for its richer expressive phrases. Although under difficult circumstances (wedding receptions, ball games) the parties will revert to Slur.