Solar Pons

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Solar Pons, better known as "Solo Ponce", was a detective who attempted to rip off the literary works of Sherlock Holmes with his own tales of the detective H.P. "Sauce" Lovecraft.

History[edit]

Solar Pons, who had known Sherlock at school, wanted to start writing his own stories, and decided to rip off Sherlock's work. He came across this idea when he noticed that Amalgam Comics and Fox Bros. Network were doing the same thing, and so decided that it would do him no harm.

How wrong Pons was.

Publication[edit]

During the 1920's, Pons wrote five books featuring H.P. "Sauce" Lovecraft, a clear spoof of Sir Arthur Conan O'Brien, and set on Praed Street (in London, the real Praed Street was known as "The Street of a Thousand Fools", but it lost it's title in 1997 to Downing Street).

The books all featured short stories about Lovecraft and his companion Solar Pons (who many see as a spoof of Sherlock Holmes, but what's in a name?). They also included a character named Dr. Lyndon Parker, who seemed to be Pons' answer to Winston Churchill, albeit not as chubby. Pons was working on a sixth book before he was forced to stop writing forever.

Lawsuit[edit]

In 1933, Pons was taken to court not only by Sherlock Holmes, but countless other detectives who Pons had spoofed, including:

All of them sued Pons for breach of copywright and for stealing all the biscuits in the Coffee Lounge. Pons attempted to defend himself by referencing Amalgam Comics and the Fox Bros. Network, but both companies refused to give evidence in defence as Pons had stupidly pointed out their breach of copywright.

Solar Pons lost the case and had to pay out $600,000 in damages to the six detectives (meaning that they got $100,000 each for those of you who are crap at math).

Aftermath[edit]

Following the Trial, Solar Pons emigrated to Canada and was never seen again. His books have never been reprinted and are thus perhaps the hardest thing for collectors to get their hands on.

Books[edit]

Meeting Solar Pons[edit]

  • The Case of the Bloody Knife (later became a Tex Avery film)
  • The Greek Interrogator
  • The Case of the Emerald Ring
  • A Touch of Influenza

Solar Pons' Guide to the Galaxy[edit]

  • The Murder of Oolon Colluphid
  • Where God Went Wrong
  • Some more of God's Greatest Mistakes
  • Who Is This God Person Anyway?
  • Well, That About Wraps It Up for God

Love, Lies and Lunacy[edit]

  • Who Censored Roger Rabbit?
  • Who Ordered Delancy Duck?
  • Who Castrated Porky Pig?
  • Who Decapitated Popeye the Sailor?

Solar Pons Goes to America[edit]

A Stitch in Time[edit]

  • The Other Time Machine
  • Clue in the Clock
  • Tick-Tock Tones
  • The Chimes

The Salmon of Doubt (Not Released)[edit]

  • The Maltese Rhino
  • Dr. Not-Really
  • Detectives in Space (Uncompleted)